Archive for May 21, 2010


On our recent visit to Future Scope and Lucent Pictures we were introduced to many 3-D translated movies, which are old movies that were re-mastered to use stereoscopic 3-D. I was skeptical about 3-D technologies and 3-D televisions but after the demo from Lucent Pictures I’m excited about the new wave of 3-D technologies. It’s surprisingly clearer with the newer technologies which shouldn’t shock anyone but I just never expected that the technology would have jumped as far as it did. What’s great about upcoming 3-D tech is the fact that it focuses more on depth rather than the dumb pop-out tricks of the past. This new focus is great for immersion into the movies or television shows because it feels more like watching the events through a window rather than a flat screen. With its new clarity, focus on depth, and old school 3-D pop-out tricks I can easily say that I’m excited instead of annoyed by the upcoming 3-D revolution.

FutureScope

FutureScope

We went to DNP (Dai Nippon Printing) on May 13th where we were witness to some of the most advanced holographic, 3-D, and touch sensing technologies in the world. The exhibition that caught my eyes more than any of the others was a machine currently in use in Louvre according to our guides. It was a table capable of sensing objects placed on it and using them to build a 3-D display on a monitor that can be viewed from all angles, it was pretty cool. The more I think about the exhibit the more I get excited about other possible uses for it. One example is with current generation video games. Customization is presently popular in mainstream video games today and I believe the scan table (as I shall call it) could be beneficial to the current trend. Artistic players could customize their characters outside of the game using the method of their choice and use color objects for artistic touches.

Did you know?

Did you know?

Otaku is the geek culture of Japan, its a world of people who obsess over things like anime and video games to the umpteenth degree. It’s a subculture that carries a bit of a negative image in the eyes of the Japanese mainstream culture. This negative image has lead to some tragic incidents like the Akihabara Massacre on June 8th 2008 where a man named Tomohiro Katō ran a truck through a crowd of otaku until it was inoperable. He then continued to attack people on foot with a dagger, in all ten people were injured and seven people died. Despite their negative image however the otaku culture has proved to be highly profitable to businesses that provide video games, manga, and anime to them, such as D3 Publishing. Personally I’m intrigued by the otaku sub-culture, being a bit of a geek myself it’s an interesting note that nerds/geeks aren’t just looked down upon in America. I just hope peoples’ misunderstanding of geeks doesn’t lead to an event similar to the Akihabara Massacre in the United States or anywhere for that matter.

Akihabara

It's a me chilling with Mario

Otaku is the geek culture of Japan, its world of people who obsess over things like anime and video games to the umpteenth degree. It’s a subculture that carries a bit of a negative image in the eyes of the Japanese mainstream culture. This negative image has lead to some tragic incidents like the Akihabara Massacre on June 8th 2008 where a man named Tomohiro Katō ran a truck through a crowd of otaku until it was inoperable. He then continued to attack people on foot with a dagger, in all ten people were injured and seven people died. Despite their negative image however the otaku culture has proved to be highly profitable to businesses that provide video games, manga, and anime to them, such a D3 Publishing. Personally I’m intrigued by the otaku sub-culture, being a bit of a geek myself it’s an interesting note that nerds/geeks aren’t just looked down upon in America. I just hope peoples’ misunderstanding of geeks doesn’t lead to an event similar to the Akihabara Massacre in the United States or anywhere for that matter.